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10 Teaching Interview Questions YOU Should Ask

When it comes to the conclusion of just about every teaching job interview, you may be provided the chance to ask a couple of questions. The job interview isn't finished at this time. Here's your opportunity to close the deal simply by asking them questions that demonstrate that you are thoughtful, equipped, and qualified for the position.

The teaching job interview will cover a number of topics. You need to have questions ready in the event that some  happen to be talked about during the course of the actual interview. You shouldn't ask questions where the reply is apparent or can be discovered through proper research of your own.

Rather, the questions you ask need to demonstrate you have carried out some investigation and value the responses you are looking for. If at all possible (and when it seems sensible to do this), I might start each question by using a sentence that leads into your question so the interview has some idea why you seeking a particular response.  Doing so will allow you to ask the questions in a conversational way and convey to the interviewers that you actually care about the response.

Obviously, you should come up with your own questions to ask, but if you're stuck for ideas, here is a list of 10 questions you can ask:

  • I can't wait to meet and get to know the teachers I will teaching with.  Can you tell me anything about the teachers I'll be working with or my team members?
  • Do you have a teacher/mentor program?
  • I was browsing your website and noticed that you have 2000 students enrolled this year.  What is the average class size?  
  • I had a number of different duties during student teaching like lunch and hallway duty.   Are there duties required in this position?
  • I believe it is important to integrate technology into my lessons as much as possible.  What kind of technology resources are available?  
  • One of my hobbies is playing golf. What kind of coaching and extra-curricular activities are available for teachers?
  • I'm always on the lookout for ways to improve my teaching and grow professionally.  What type of professional improvement opportunities does the school provide?
  • I'm looking forward to setting up my room and decorations.  Will I be sharing a classroom with other teachers?
  • I believe that engaging and exciting lessons are essential in creating a learning environment where all students can learn. Is time provided on a daily basis for lesson planning and prep?
  • During student teaching, I had to submit lesson plans on a weekly basis.  Do you require lessons plans be turned in for review?  If so, how often?

By asking the correct questions, you are able to show that you're competent, educated, and eager for the position. You ought to develop several of your personal questions, utilizing them to emphasize some of your own talents which are not discussed during the interview.